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Newspaper Archive of
Cloverdale Reveille
Cloverdale, California
Lyft
August 13, 1980     Cloverdale Reveille
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August 13, 1980
 

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of the past he highway caJ's on ive little that highway Some paths that mountains, e that's the way They just r 0tstructi0n that When man followed the wagons and Wider. There of roads like the thorofares, were in- turns made it wagons to communities need for better apparent and with pick work. Oregon Trail, started this men ira- toil ferried across bridges were County and it was soon the influx of better a permit by the for a toll road, the permit was issued and called the Lakeport and Cloverdale Toll Road. This route travelled from Cloverdale up Pine Mountain through Tyler Valley over the country line at the summit with an elevation of 2700 feet. Three and a half miles being mostly down ridges to Highland Springs where they connected with local roads in Lake County. It followed the old Indian trails later known as the Russian River Trial. About a mile or so before reaching Highland Springs there was an open glade. There a toll house was built, known as Toll House Flat, located in Tyler Valley near the Lake County Summit, one-half mile west of the presently little used road. Although it was an im- provement over the im- migrant or soldier roads, it was still steep and treacherous and received the nickname "Hard Scrabble." Bates of tolls used in those days as set by the board of supervisors were as follows: six horse team, $I; four horse team, 75 cents; two horse team, 50 cents; one horse and buggy 75 cents; horseman, 15 cents; pack/ horse, I0 cents; cattle and loose horses, 4 cents; sheep and hogs, 3 cents. The name of the toll road was changed in 1876 to The Lakeport- Cloverdale Wagon Road Company. The road received poor care due to the com- petition of other toll roads and by 1881 was being in- vestigated by the road commissioner. It was still in use in 1888 and some armmd that time ceased to charge toll. The Highland Springs Road placed a small building in the north section and a deep ditch was dug acro the old road for a short time. By 1893 the old road was still in good shape but little used. Today it is only travelled by people living in the area and beyond is only a jeep trail with locked gates. However, if one wants to observe the scenery and see what early travellers saw, you can drive it in a short time on paved road. When you reach Mendocino County it becomes a dirt road over the summit to Tyler Valley and only private beyond there. There were other toll roaIs in this area such as the now Highway 128 to Fort Bragg. Another road went from the old town of Glendale on the Geysers Road to Lake County, now abandoned, and Glendale became the Kissack ranch. There was an immigrant road from Upper Clear Lake to Napa City and the old hog- back road to the Geysers now replaced by-the present road which passes through what was Mercuryville. On Geysers Road a short distance out of Cloverdale at the cattle guard, you may observe the ruins of what was once a tollhouse. I am sure there were many more and if any of the readers recall them or have information on them we'd like to hear about it. When you think of the roads we have today and how little time it takes to travel them we can give thanks to the foresight and per- serverence and hard, back- breaking labor of the pioneers who saw the need and filled it. Go slow sometime and look at the scenery, it's the same as was seen and enjoyed in their ride is up the Old Hopland Road to the old town past the pioneer cemetery and on up to Talmadge and back to Ukiah. A more hair-raising route is the Old Hopland grade to Lake County, but it is beautiful. Information about the toll roads are through the courtesy of Henry Mauldin, Lake County Historian. Keep working on those biographies and send them in as soon as possible. We are compiling a great hisory of Cloverdale with lots of pic- tures to be included in the book. Don't miss out on this opportunity to be a part of this area's history and be a part of today's history in the making. DS to g and Electric today accelerating its of the 120,000 o its electric System that as an in- / / t estimated two to three $50 COmplete the Program, if turn out of non-PC'B been used. distribution the 1920s to of ser- and make aore efficient. Occasionally their in- leak out. replacement carried out,* special on PCB will cut possibility company used PCBs :/ / A bank of six eapitators is lowered from s power pole as part of s pro}ect to replace 120,000 capacitors that contain PCBs. The company will replace all such capacitors in a two-to-three- year program exFected to emt alqwmdmately $50 mdLUkm. Wlhdle the program is going on, PG&E wiU install special prefect/re fames am PCB eapadtm-s that wIHll cmt snbstantialIy the possilbuity of PCB spills. the accelerated phaseout is completed. "Our crews have been trained to handle these spills and to clean them up," he said. "If it is necessary to remove soil or lawn areas, PG&E will restore any property as nearly as possible to the state it was in before the cleanup started." "While only one in about 750 of all PCB-filled capacitors has failed an- nually, even this low hazard of PCB spills will be reduced to zero at the end of the replacement program," Langley said. as insulating fluid in capacitors until 1977. Such use was discontinued after P(a3s were dassified as a toxic substance. PG&E Senior Vice President Ellis B. Langley noted that some PCB spills will inevitably occur before Open University program offers rtunities of the program, any ex- that get , or exploring field. Open by e University Extended local standard without and ad- k:hool. University, helping, to traditional back to Dr. Carroll Vice Community Extended those who college or a few in courses only to have been ur regular Programs." University are now afternoon are asdiversified as the in- terests of students them- selves. A sampling of course. available this fall includes such titles as "Starting a Successful Small Business" and "Income Taxes," both advanced courses offered by the Management Studies Department ) "Oceanography," offered by the Geography Department; and "Behavior Mod- ification," which may be taken through the Psychology Department. Timely courses in politics include "The American Presidency" and "Third for fulltime or the day. to art to economics Courses of. in,gram World Political Systems." The SU Education Department offers courses ranging from "Language Disorders and Development" to "Educational Assessment of Exceptional Children," as well as courses to help those with out-of-state teaching credentials attain status to teach in California. Among the English of- ferings are courses in poetry writing, news writing and film studies. New this fall is a special noontime lecture series on literature which will focus on the role of the senses in the creative process. Other campus innovations, such as the increasing con- centration in such areas as computer science, media studies and gerontology, are also open to nontraditional students throuUgh the Open University program. To be eligible to enroll in any of the over 1,200 courses at SSU this fall, one need only obtain the consent of the instructor and meet any prerequisites for the course. Assistance in this process and furlher information on registration and fees may be brained by calling the Office of Extended Education at (707} 664-2394. Sculpture competition deadline September 1 The City of Santa Rosa and the Redevelopment Agency of Santa Rosa have an- nounod a $21,000 competition for an. innovative sculpture for the northwest corner of Old Courthouse Square, in downtown Santa Rosa. The competition is restricted to Sonoma County resident artists only and will be juried by a panel of local citizens appointed by the City of Santa Rosa. Proposals may be in the form of drawings, sketches, 35 mm slides or photographs. Completed works, as well as proposals, will also be con- sidered. At the completion of jurying, three finalists will be selected and will be offered $750 to prepare a model- maquette of their proposal. Durable materials will be an important consideration because of the project's location in a heavy traffic area. A workable water fountain setup may be ac- commodated in the design. The $21,000 commission includes Ihe cost of installing the winhing proposal. Deadline for submissions of proposals is Monday, Sep- tember 1, 1980. All proposals should be submitted to the care of Eve Chung, Exhibitions Director, Sonoma County Arts Council, 7o9 Davis Street, Santa Rosa, CA 954O1. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Wednesday, August 13, 1980- Page 15 Shown is a pkture of the ledge of the old O'ecker estate at Palomino Lakes. If anyone has any pletures of the estate or information back in the days when the Creckers owned it, would yon please contact Janlce Corey, editor of the Reveille. or Jack Howell of the Historical Society. Photo by Janlce. Geyserville Area Busine Directory FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THIS DIRECTORY CA 894-3339 ............................................................. .. *.*..-.......*'............*..*..-`..............*........*.*......'*.*....*.'...'......*..............*.....'...`...*....................-..........`....*..*.* :. ;.;.-.....;.. ;. . . :. . . . :. . :. :.: . .:. ;.  . ..". ?." .: .?. ?. . ?. ? .% ?. T. ? . .. !.. T. ?. !. ?. :. . :.. ? . . .. . , ?. :.;. :..;...............-. b ..-........................-.: ................-............., ..., ............. ,......... ,............-.......... ,. ,-........., .........-..o ";:: :::iii Geyserville is the home of one of the ::::!i ::i::i finest Italian Restaurants in Northern i!!i California - Catelli's , The Rex. Senti i!::! ii!ii and Virginia Catelli opened the iiii :.:i!ii restaurant in 1936 and have kept it a !i::i i::il family-owned establishment since iii! ill . ....... then. Richard Catelli, their son, isnow iii ..... "" " the owner and operator and is assisted !::ii by his lovely daughter Domenica. ii!! i::::::! Richard is still using the same iiii ::!ii recipes the family used for years and ii::i !ii:  maintaining the fine quality for which ::i:: ":iii i Catelli's gained it's fame. The menu is varied and includes such specialties as ii}i rabbit, scampi, sweet breads, as well ilii as steaks, seafood, poultry, pasta and !!!i many other items, iii! The bar is separate from the dining ilii room and offers an excellent selection ii!i :::' of liquor and wines. :::: ... ,.................. ...... ... ............................... . ...... ...... .................. ................................................................................. ........... : .......... : .... -.:. BINO'S ,u,o REPAIR Under the new ownership of Jim Romaln Repair work on all makes of foreign & domestic cars & trucks Call 857-3790 for appt. 21=110 Redwwod Hwy. Oeyservllle Bosworth Hardware .Paint *Hardware ,Household Items Geyserville Ave., Geyserville 857-3463 Visit Fine Italian Cuisine (707).s57-9904 Over 39 years in the talme Iocationl LAMPSON TRACTOR -Growers Supply & Irrigation, Inc. ACE Irrigation Systems, Hardware & Equipment, Swimming Pools, Housewares and Farm Supplies 20750 Geyserville Avenue 857-3484 This space Availal)le Reasonable Rates Call 894-3339 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville 43=1-16191 857-344=1