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Cloverdale Reveille
Cloverdale, California
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February 2, 2011     Cloverdale Reveille
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February 2, 2011
 

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PAGE 8 -- WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2011  CLOVERDALE REVEILLE CLOVERDALE, CALIFORNIA LOOKING FOR LOCAL COMING EVENTS? ] THEN CHECK OUT OUR WEEKLY CALENDAR ON PAGE 11 n Select from dozens of styles and hundreds of fabrics at reasonable prices Call or come by today 12# South Cloverdale Boulevard 707 894 4080 www.flocloverdale.com Brakes FP}N  ])PIWffI Tune-Ups An Work Timing Belts CV Joints Guaranteed 011 Change & Lube Fuel Injection Service A.C. Repairs & Conversions ASE Master Tech 8943614 101 N. Cloverdale Blvd. Location 449 Center St Heal&burg 707.473.9720 Store Hours Mon-Sat lOam--6pm Sun 1 lam--Spm electronics .:. video gaines.:, toys .'. microwaves vacuums.:- home d6cor designer clothing .:- bed & bath .t. "kitchenware appl]ailces ..'. tools -.'- purses ..'. pet supplies make-up o gifts fimlimre.....etc. .............................. iilEi .... Jil .... o , ........................... J' .. Low Cost Pet Vaccination Clinics Every Saturday from 5 to 6 pm Now Carrying Premium Pet Foods Everyday In Cloverdale At... CLOVERDALE Open Monday - Friday 7:30am-7pm Saturday 8-6 - Sunday 9-5 The helpful place. 894-2165 - 750 S. Cloverdale Blvd. NOTICES ANIMAL ItOSPITAL OF C..l.X) ERDALE February is National Pet Dental Health Month Schedule a dental cleaning for the month of February and receive $40 off our already low clinic prices! Call for Appointment! 894-3951 www. a tfim aih os pit alo f clov e rd ale. c o m CLOVERDALE MINI STORAGE 35 INDUSTRIAL DR. (707) 894-3682 OUR RATES ARE LOWER THAN MOST, 6X6 = $45 5Xl 0 = $49 6X12 = $61 10X10 = $82 12X12 = $95 i =$12s ! 10X26 = $145 10X30 = $157 J SECOND MONTH FREE ON SELECTED SIZES NO ADMINISTRATIVE FEES NO DEPOSITS, 24 HOUR ACCESS ON SITE MANAGER OFFER SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE Cloverdale Historical Society speaker series has returned The History Center Speaker Se- ries has returned this year in con- junction with the History Center exhibit, "Wings Over Sonoma County," The story of Fred J. Wise- man and his historic Air Mail flight of 1911 and first flight over our Cit- rus Fair. The first speaker in the series, is Col. Clarence E "Bud" Anderson, USAF retired Col. Anderson is a WWII Triple Ace fighter pilot and a veteran experimental test pilot. During WWII he served two combat tours escorting heavy bombers over Europe in the P-51 Mustang, from Nov. 1943 through Jan. 1945. He flew 116 combat mis- sions and destroyed 16 and 1/4 en- emy aircraft in aerial combat and another one on the ground. He has an extensive flight testing background spanning a 25 year pe- riod. At Wright-Paterson AFB, Ohio he was a fighter test pilot and later became Chief of Fighter Oper- ations. Other assignments in his 30 years continuous military service include duty as: Commander of an F-86 squadron in post war Korea, Corn- mander of an F-105 wing on Okina- wa, and two assignments to the Pentagon. Further duty saw Col. Anderson serving in Southeast Asia as commander of the 355th tactical fighter wing Col. Anderson's many decorations include two legions of merit, five distinguished flying crosses, the bronze star, 16 air med- als, the French Legion of Honor and the Croix de Guerre. In 1990 Col. Anderson wrote an autobiography with another author (autographed and on sale at the talk for $30) which has been described by the Historian of the Air Force as "the finest pilot memories of WWII." In this book titled "To Fly and Fight" Gen. Chuck Yeager de- scribes Anderson as "a mongoose, the best fighter pilot I've ever seen." Col. Anderson's talk will be on Feb. 15, 2011 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Cloverdale History Cen- ter, 215 No. Cloverdale Blvd. Ad- mission is free. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to 707-894- 2067 or Joaquin at 894-5653. Article abridged from Col. Anderson's biogra- phy of July, 2005. Submitted by ]oaquin Espinosa. SMART G. M. leaving post Lillian Hames, who helped trans- form SMART from a good idea into a transportation reality, announced that she will be leaving the agency after nearly a decade as its General Manager. Ms. Hames informed the Board of Directors of her decision, which is effective immediately. David Heath, the District's Director of Fi- nance and Administration, will serve as Interim General Manager until a permanent replacement is hired. Ms. Hames was a transportation consultant when she came to work as project director for what was then known as the SMART Com- mission in 2001. She was the dis- trict's only employee for several years, shepherding a nascent idea to use the publically owned North- western Pacific Railroad right-of- way for a modern commuter train and bicycle-pedestrian pathway that would offer an alternative to the congestion of Highway 101. After SMART became a special district created by Assembly Biill 2224 in 2003, she oversaw the initial conceptual design of the project arid the development of the 2006 Final Environmental Impact Report. In 2008, nearly 70 percent of Marin and Sonoma County voters approved Measure Q, a quarter- cent sales tax to provide major funding for the SMART train and pathway project. Since then Ms. Hames has over- seen the transformation of the agen- FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 00239 Wilson Fleming Estate Winery located at: 4001 Highway 128 Geyserville, CA 95441 (Sonoma County) Mailing address: PO Box 156 Geyserville, CA 95441 is (are) hereby registered by the following owner(s): Murphy Vineyards, LLC 4001 Highway 128 Geyserville, CA 95441. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company (California). The registrant com- menced to transact business under the fictitious name or names above on NA. Signed: James Michael Murphy, Manager. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Sonoma County on: 1/14/11. I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct copy of the original state- ment on file in my office. JANICE ATKINSON, County Clerk, By/s/ Julie Garfia SEAL #64 Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 201t FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 00121 1. Azzaro Cellars 2. Tres Hljas Vineyards located at: 21684 8th Street East, Suite 440 Sonoma, CA 95470 (Sonome County) Mailing address: same is (are) hereby registered by the follow- ing owner(s): Enkidu Wine LLC 21684 8th Street East, Suite 440 Sonoma, CA 95476, This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company (California). The registrant com- menced to transact business under the fictitious name or names above on NA. Signed: Phillip P. Staehle. Managing Member I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Sonoma County on: 1/10/11. I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct copy of the original state- ment on file in my office. JANICE AIKINSON, County Clerk, By/s/ C. Reinking SEAL #67 Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2011 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FiLE NO. 04812 1. Tula Vista Vineyards 2. Tula Vista Winery located at: 22281 Chianti Road Geyserville, CA 95441 (Sonoma County) Malting address: 349 Healdsburg Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448 is (are) hereby registered by the following owner(s): Aseentia Wine Estates, LLC 349 Healdsburg Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448. Yhis business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company (Dela- ware). The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names above on NA. Signed: Katherine A DeVillers, Sr. V.P.. I declare that all information in this state- ment is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Sonoma County on: 12/2t/11. I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. JANICE ATKINSON, County Clerk, By/s/ Julie Garfia SEAL #68 Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2011 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 00285 1. Kutch 2. Kutch Wines 3. Block 7 4. Kutch Trading located at: 10200 Sonoma Hwy Kenwood, CA 95452 (Sonoma County) Maging address: same is (are) hereby registered by the fallow- ing owner(s): Kutch Wines 10200 Sonoma Hwy Kenwood, CA 95452. This business is conducted by: a Corporation (Califor- nia). The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names above on NA. Signed: Jamie Kuteh. President. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Sonoma County on: 1/18/11. I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. JANICE ATKINSON, County Clerk, By/s/ C. Farias SEAL #69 Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2011 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 00140 Look and Feel Design located at: 1556 Gary Court Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (Sonoma County) Mailing address: same is (are) hereby registered by the following owner(s): Vickie Garwacki 1556 Gary Ct. Robnert Park, CA 94928. This busi- ness is conducted by: an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names above on Jan. 1, 2011. Signed: Viekie L. Garwacki. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) This statement was filed with Ihe County Clerk of Sonoma County on: 1/10/11. I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. JANICE ATKINSON, County Clerk, By/s/ C. FarJas SEAL #70 Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2011 cy from a relatively small planning operation to one that is preparing to begin construction this year on the largest single public project ever undertaken in the North Bay. Ms. Hames said that after a de- cade of work on SMART, and with the project poised to enter the con- struction phase, it is a good time for her to pursue new opportunities. SMART Chairwoman Valerie Brown said she and other members of the Board offered Ms. Hames heartfelt thanks for her years of ser- vice and dedication to the project. - Chris Coursey Centennial of air mail stamp sets on sale now The Cloverdale History Center gift shop has received a limited number of Commemorative Stamp sets honoring the Centennial of Fred Wise- man's first in America air mail flight of Feb. 17 & 18, 1911. The historic flight was from Petaluma to Santa Rosa, a flying distance of some 14 to 16 miles. Commemorative set number one consists of a 6x9 color postcard with four images depicting Wiseman's flying career and a 44 cent stamp in a light blue color showing Wiseman's plane and the date of his flight. Commemorative set number two consists of a 6x9 airmail envelope with red, white and blue color border and a photo of the 1968 Wiseman monu- ment dedication in Petaluma, CA. The same 44 cent stamp is placed in the upper right of the envelope. The price of each set is $3 which includes sales tax. Both sets of Wiseman Commemorative stamps are limited issue and are not available at any US Post Office. All sales benefit the educational and exhibit programs of the Cloverdale Historical Society, a non-profit 501 C-3 Corp. Fred Wiseman Commemorative stamp sets can be purchased at the Cloverdale History Center Gift Shop located at 215 N. Cloverdale Blvd., Hours are: Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Phone 707-894-2067. -]oaquin Espinosa RI ) W S MAN ..........  US. MONK)MI[IN'I DI{DICA'|ION [ ::::::  I "' . By Jim DeMartini The Forager and friend afield everal years ago I found myself, on hands and knees, dragging my old 30-30 deer rifle inside a leafy tunnel which ran through an enormous stand of manzanita. Theoretically, I was deer hunting--mostly, I was trying to stay alive by avoiding having to traverse a shale slide that was incredibly steep, anything but stable, and which ended 200 feet below in an escape- proof granite draw. None of this bothered me as much as the dis- tinct smell, all around me, of wild pig. The tunnel I was in was a pig freeway running along the slope, and the way I saw it, I was at about eye level with a decent-sized boar's tusks. That's when I decided I hated Manzanita. But, as they say, I've seen the light. Manzanita is in- credible! Manzanita is the ubiqui- tous shrub we see on the hills all around Cloverdale. It has smooth red bark with twisting branches and round leaves. It hugs the ground but can grow to over 15 feet tall. The Spanish translation for manzanita is "little apple" which aptly describes the appearance of the man- zanita fruit. Native Californians up and down the coast har- vested manzanita for an incredible variety of uses, using nearly every part of the bush. Kids would eat the flowers for a treat. These were collected in the late winter and early spring. In July and August the women would take their children out to harvest manzanita berries. The women would beat the bushes with sticks, letting the berries fall into woven baskets. These berries were the real treasure. Manzanita cider was, before the European in- vasion, the universal California drink. The ripe berries were dried in the sun and then crushed or roughly broken. The resulting mash was soaked in water until the berry essence was leached out and then filtered in woven sieves. Sometimes fresh berries were used for the cider but the pre- ferred method was to dry the berries first. The resulting cider would keep for several days. I have not read where the Pomo ever let the cider ferment but I can't help but believe that this didn't occur from time to time. Besides drinking the manzanita cider, the Pomo cooks would make a fine mash or flour- like substance from dried berries. This mash was a staple when baked into cookies and breads. The mash could be stored for use during the hard times in winter. The Pomo mixed the berry mash with salmon eggs to make a high pro- tein, high carbohydrate loaf that, after baking, would keep long enough to pro- vide food for a long hunt or trek to the Coast for abalo- ne and seaweed. During the early summer the mash could be mixed with dried wild plums and baked or dried. The berry mash was also boiled, using very hot rocks in a waterproof basket, to make a mush. Berries would be added to the mush making for a real treat. The Pomo made tea out of the manzanita bark. It was said to ease nausea and upset stomach. Manzanita makes great firewood for outdoor cooking. Once it has burned to coals it will pro- duce high heat for an extended period. The best poison oak remedy I have ever used is easy to make and readily available to Clover- dale residents. Manzanita grows all around us and is easily harvested. Take a shopping bag full of manzanita leaves and cover them with water in a large pot. Boil the leaves for a half hour, or so, until they have broken down and have become somewhat mushy, then strain the leaves out of the liquid. The resulting solution is a very strong astrin- gent which, if you generously apply to poison oak irritation, will quickly dry the weeping and provide phenomenal itch relief. DO NOT DRINK! For fishing and hunting seasons and regulations go to http://www.dfg.ca.gov/ Attorney James F. DeMartini can be contacted at 707 894-5000