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Cloverdale Reveille
Cloverdale, California
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January 2, 1991     Cloverdale Reveille
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January 2, 1991
 

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Pae 4 Cloverdale Reveille January 2. 1991 Editor's Corner Just for the record... The Cloverdale Reveille is a NEWSpaper and, as such, has a responsibility to report the news, both good and bad. We have made it our policy to accentuate the positive whenever possible, and, unlike the metropoli- tan newspapers, we attempt to treat local tragedies with a great deal of sensitivity. This week's Letters to the Editor contains comments from two resi- dents complaining about the Rev- eille's suggestions for top stories of 1990. As reporters, it is our responsibil- ity to report the news, counter ru- mors and keep the facts current. Just because a tragic event hap- pens in a small town doesn't mean the local newspaper should gloss over it and try to pretend it didn't happen. If that was the case, there would be no need for a newspaper. One writer noted that "the families need our support and not to be re- minded over and over of their losses." Would it really be better if we all just forgot about it and pre- tended their lives never made a difference? For the record, please let me say if a tragedy of the magnitude that happened to at least two Clover- dale families this year happened to me, you better believe I would want the whole town to think it was the most important news story of the year! In fact, I would find a tre- mendous amount of comfort in knowing they did! Both writers expressed concern for the feelingsofthe families. They might be interested to know that at least 5 of the surveys returned were from family members of one of the victims. They did not hesitate to say they considered their loss the top news story in Cloverdale during 1990! MJW Bush governed by US Constitution judge rules U.S. Rep. Barbara Boxer, D-CA, has called a federal court ruling in the war powers lawsuit brought against President Bush "a moral vic- tory that reinforces our contention that the President must seek a decla- ration of war before launching an attack in the Persian Gulf." Rep. Boxer is an original plaintiff in the suit brought by 54 Members of Congress seeking to enjoin the Presi- dent from undertaking offensive ac- tion in the Gulf. "This should signal an urgent warning to the President that he can- not unilaterally carry this nation to war without the consent of Congress, Rep. Boxer said. "Although on technical grounds the judge did not enjoin the Presi- dent, he did alTuan the President's obligation to seek a declaration of war," she declared. "He also real fibel that this is not just stration into reconsidering state- ments by the President and the Secre- tary of Defense that the President does not need approval by Congress before making war. The President clearly is bound by the Constitution." In his ruling, the Judge said "...the forces involved are of such magni- tude and significance as to present no serious claim that a war would not ensue if they became engaged in combat, and it is therefore clear that congressional approval is required if Congress desires to become in- volved." Rep. Boxer said she believes a majority of Congress supports the contention that the President must go to Congress before launching an at- tack. "The number of Members signing up as plaintiffs grew .=day by day after we first filed the suit, she pointed Free care available for head injuredperson $100,000 in rehabilitation is avail- able for a Northern Califomai resi- dent who has suffered a severe head injury and cannot afford reha- bilitation. The free care is being offered as part of a nationwide schol- arship program sponsored by the New Medico Head Injury System. Effects from a severe head injury - everything from memory loss to personality change to physi- cal impairment - can be devastating to both an individual and the individ- ual's family. The financial burden of rehabilitation can be nearly as traumatic. The scholarship recipient will take part in a rehab program athe New Medico Community Re-Entry Center at Apple Valley, located in Apple Valley, CA, which specializes in the care and treatment of head- injured individuals. Interested candidates must submit an application by Feb. 1, 1991. The scholarship recipient will be admit- ted to the program on March 1,1991. To receive an application, contact the Northern California Head Injury Association at P.O. Box 28164, San Jose, CA 95 ! 28, or (408) 971-2310. Applicants for the schol- arship must be 18 years of age or older, medically stable, without severe behavioral problems, and willing to participate in an active rehabilitation program. The New Medico Head Injury System i the nation's largest net- work of Iead injury treatment pro- grams, with more than 35 facilities across the country. The company provides information on head injury and rehabilitation facilities through its head injury information line, 1-800-CARE TBI, ext. 400. Two seats available on California Senior Legislature Are seniors able to influence the (,AA) will sponsor the CSL elec- legislative process? Most definitely don. The AAA is curently recruiting yes! Persons over 60 years of age candidates for the upcoming dec- make up a large voting bloc in tion. California and in Sonoma County. Any person over the age of 60 They also have an influential voice who is a registered voter and a per- in the State Legislature through a manent resident of Sonoma County dedicated andactivegroup, the Cali- is eligible to run for the Senior fornia Senior Legislature (CSL). Legislature. Candidates must file a The California Senior Legislature petition with a minimum number of was established in 1980 to gather .signatures (25) of registered voters information on senior needs and over 60 in the County. Only regis- translate these needs into leg;s- tered voters over 60 are eligible to lative bills for sponsorship and vote in the CSL election. action by the State Legislature. Interested seniors are strongly The CSL is made up of 40 elected encouraged to become an election Senior Senators and 80 Senior candidate. Election materials and Assemblypersons over the age of nomination petitions areavailableat 60. The CSL meets annually in a The Area Agency on Aging office, five-day legislative session in Sac- located at 940 Hopper Ave., Santa ramento to develop legislation in Rosa, CA 95403, or call 527-3138. }esponse to needs and concerts of The deadline to turn in the mater;- older Californians. als including the signed petition is In addition, the CSL members January 8, 1991. The election will work throughout the year to find . be held on Tuesday, March 12,1991, authors in the State Legislature and at various polling sites throughout to advocate for the priority legisla- the County, tion adopted at the annual session. Since its inception, the CSL has --- enjoyed a 75% success rate on the "YOUR passage of legislation based on the CSL priorities - a most impressive HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER" record. Since 1879 CSL representatives work actively ....... in their local community to deter- " a politieal question but a legal issue." out. "lnfact, on the day the case was mine the special needs of the sen- The Congresswoman added, "This heard eight more Members signed ruling should spur the Bush Admini- up." ;ors in their area. Sonoma County is represented by one Senior Sen- ator and one Senior Assemblyper- son. These two-year positions are currently held by Robert Maggiora of Santa Rosa and J. Donald Hos-, ford of Healdsburg. In March, "1991, the sonoma County Area Agency on Aging The Annual General Membership Meeting of the Cloverdale Senior Multi-Purpose Center will be held on Tues., Jan. 8 at 2 p.m. at the Center. At this time; the general member- ship will be given an update on the activities and projects undertaken during the previous year and an opportunity to discuss future direc- tions for the Center. A most important aspect of the annual meeting is the election of the Center's Board of Directors. The nominating committee, consist- ing of Chairperson Diana Treankle, Marvis Knupfer and Rachael Garri- son have submitted the following list of persons willing to serve on the Board: (* indicates new recruits) Mario Michelon, Iris Snedker, Viola Groves, *Peggy Ebert, Diana Treankle, Mavis Knupfer, Bobble Lyons, *Elizabeth Grange, Gene- vieve Malmstrom, Rachael Garri- son, Keith LeBaron, *Dorothy Meis- ter, June Novak and *May Tobener. The Annual Meeting also serves to "kick-off" the yearly membership drive. Annual dues can be paid at the meeting or by dropping in at the Center any Tues. or Wed. \\; COMMUNITY CALENDAR Office Hours Mon.- Fri, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CLOVERDALE REVEILLE Publisher Wednesday, January 2 Chamber of Commerce Coffee Mtg, Clvd. Coffee Shop ......................................... 7:00 a.m. Senior Center, Grange Hall ....................... 9:30-4:00 pan. Soroptimists, Ramazzotti's ................................ 1:00 p.m. Cloverdaie Grange, Grange Hall ....................... 7:00 pan, Roaring 20's Lioness. Wallace House ......... . ...... 7:00 p.m. American Legion Gun Club, Vets Bldg ............. 7:30 p.m. Planning ConunLion, City Hall ...................... 7:30 p.m. Thursday, January 3 Thrift Sale, United Church ....................... 10:00-3:00 p.m.' Rotary, Vets Bldg ........................................... 12:15 p.m. Candle'Light Vigil for Peace Broad St. & Cloverdale Bled .................. 5:00-6:00 p.m. Hometown Workout, Vets Bldg ........................ 6:00 p.m. Overeaters Anon.(How) Fellowship Hall ........... 6:00 p.m. Duplicate Bridge, Vcts Bldg., .......................... 7:00 p.m. Cloverdal¢ Lions, Vets Bldg ............................. 7:30 p.m. Friday, January 4 Special Chamber of Commerce Meeting, Cloverdale Coffee Shop .................... : ........... 7:00 a.m. Senior Day Center, Grange Hall ............... ..9:30-2:00 p.m. Emergency Food Pantry United Church ...................................... 1:00-3:00 p.m. Redwood Empire Trailriders, City Park ............. 7:00 p.m. Bingo, Fellowship Hall ..................................... 7:30 p.m. Preliminary Queen Contest, Citrus Fair ............. 8:00 p an. Saturday, January $ Scouts' Christmas Tree Pickup begins ............. 9:00 s.m. Dog Vaccines & Licenses,a CHS Auto Shop ....................................... 10:00-Noon Dog Licenses, Police Dept ........................ 1:30-4:30 pan. Swap Meet, Citrus Fair .............................. 7:00-4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 6 Swap Meet, Citrus Fair .............................. 7:00-4:00 p.m. Monday, December 7 Grange Blossom Garden Club, TBA ................. 1:30 p.m. Hometown Workout, Vets Bldg .......................... 6:00 p.m. Overeaters Anon. (How) Baptist Church ........... 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 8 Century Lions, Cloverdale Coffee Shop ............ 7:00 a.m. Senior Center, Grange Hall ........................ 9:30-4:00 pan. Senior Multi-Purpose Center Annual Meeting, Grange Hall .................................................. 2:00 p.m. School Board, CHS Library ............................... 7:30 p.m. Ladies Circle of Druids, Druids Hall ............... ,.8:00 pan. VFW, Vets Bldg ..................................... . .......... 8:00 p.m. 'i't it'; 01,1) J"l'.;l",l) , ,IZi,,' 228 S. East St. 8 am - 5:30 pm 9-4 Sat 894-5297 Fred Young C & . ompany Mortuaries 728 N. Cloverdale Blvd. 894-2540 I Bonny J. Hanchett Editor Mary Jo Winter Reporter Roberta Lyons Advert(singlC irculation Bonnie Goodman Composing ,Bonnie Pearson Reminders are not appreciated Pull out before it's too late! Editor: If anyone would say President George Bush were OUT OF HIS MIND, they would be correct! The President needlessly has amassed a military force in the Per- sian Gulf area the size that would be expected if our own country were threatened by an invader. And for what? To win back a little country, Kuwait, from its invader, while the Kuwaitis themselves do apparently nothing to regain their country; they, an extremely wealthy nation, should be arming them- selves for their dwn defense. Bush, I hesitate to say, is acting like a childish bully - "Look at my muscle. I'm the biggest, get out of my way!" Bush should accept loss-of-face, pull out of the Gulf area, bring all U.S. military home at once, before an impending doom. His U.S. people would consider him a winner, a credit to his high office, a courageous act - to hell with what the Irakis would call it! Stewart M. Snyder (A loyal U.S. citizen) Finds "Top 10" poll offensive Editor: I'm writing to express my disap- pointment in the Reveille ballot to chose "The Top 10 Cloverdale News Stories for 1990". I think your poll is in very poor taste. The families and friends involved or concerned with tragedies do not want to be reminded publicly in such a hurtful way. Please have some compassion. Surely there are other ways to know which articles Cloverdale residents enjoy. Perhaps you could ask for suggestions to improve your paper. If necessary, after major local events such as Citrus Fair, Harvest Festival, elections, club/organization activities, you could ask subscribers to rate your coverage on a scale,of 1 to 5 with comments My suggestions would be to put school news on one or two corn- such as the Apple com- program currently taking place. Finish all articles oh one page. It's too small a paper to turn to another page and search for two paragraphs. I'm sure you will get positive feed back, as well, on things that readers like about your paper. Come on Reveille. Show a lot more class. Please delete your an- nual poll. Thank you. Kathy Dogali CIoverdale Editor: I, as well as many others, your top 10 stories of 1990 to insensitive and in poor taste. understand your need to interest and circulation, capitalizing on such tragedies death of respected Cloverdale zens is not only sad, but morbid well. You are not dealin major metropolitan city, town where people know other and feel for each other we're hurting. We appreciated the articles ten at the time keeping tion circulating as accurate as sible, but could these really sidered highlights for the town Cloverdale? Perhaps we ask the family and friends of involved! Name Withheld By P.S. My name need not be because there are too many people who feel the same way. truly believe the families need support and not to be over and over of their losses. Dog lic.=nses availabl0000 at clini00 Dog owners are encouraged tJ/' take advantage of the low c.' rabies clinic, sponsored by the R wood Empire Veterinary Associa-t tion, to be held Saturday, Jan. 5 I from 10 a.m. to Noon in the Autk Shop at Cloverdale High scboo00stor Shots will only be $3. Ull]tntt Dog licenses for 1991 can also ! "'''= purchased during the clinic, or lat L that afrnoon from 1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. in front of the the polic L station, lUr son Licenses are $5 for neuteretrEtmas animals, $10. for unneutered. /he'd .dse penalty wtll be added for licen purchased after March 1. [ry sad. Animal Control will be selling .tiC.my Ti licenses in front of the police statio he was from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. again o11 pain t Monday, Jan. 21, Friday, Feb. 8 ; tn II rl C " Monday, Feb 18. i ? The Cloverdale Reveille Start the New Year (119-020 USPS) is published 52 tim¢ per year by Hanehett Pub- out right with a Inc. on Wednesdays at family Clover- insurance check-up dale' CA 95425 (707) 894-3339 Call Joy Warr,m 894-2376 Subscriptions: $15 per year, $18" per year out of Sonoma i County. Sngle copy 35¢. I Second Class Postage Paid ( at Cloverdal¢, CA 95425. Postmaster:.: Send address changes to the Cioverdale Reveille, P.O. Box 157, Clo- verdale, CA 95425 Life-Fire-Home-Personal-Commercial 104 E. First St. For Your Insurance Needs *, Phoenix Auto Restoration Factory Trained Personnel Men- Fri 8:00-5:00pm by Appointment Complete Auto Body & Restoration Shop Paint "Facility on Site 235 South East St. 894-9292